April 12, 2014

Intermediate Python: An Open Source Documentation Project

There is a huge demand for Python training materials, and there are many people who just don't have the spare cash to buy books or videos. That's one reason why, in conjunction with a new Intermediate Python video series I have just recorded for O'Reilly Media I am launching a new, open source, documentation project.

My intention in recording the videos was to produce a broad set of materials (the linked O'Reilly page contains a good summary of the contents). I figure that most Python programmers will receive excellent value for money even if they already know 75% of the content. Those to whom more is new will see a correspondingly greater benefit. But I was also keenly aware that many Python learners, particularly those in less-developed economies, would find the price of the videos prohibitive.

With O'Reilly's contractual approval the code that I used in the video modules, in IPython Notebooks, is going up on Github under a Creative Commons license [EDIT: The initial repository is now available and I very much look forward to hearing from readers and potential contributors - it's perfectly OK if you just want to read the notebooks, but any comments yuu have about your experiences will be read and responded to as time is available]. Some of it already contains markdown annotations among the code, other notebooks have little or no commentary. My intention is that ultimately the content will become more comprehensive than the videos, since I am using the video scripts as a starting point.

I hope that both learner programmers and experienced hands will help me turn it into a resource that groups and individuals all over the world can use to learn more about Python with no fees required. The current repository has to be brought up to date after a rapid spate of editing during the three-day recording session. It should go without saying that viewer input will be very welcome, since the most valuable opinions and information comes from those who have actually tried to use the videos to help them learn.

I hope this will also be a project that sees contributions from documentation professionals (and beginners they can help train), so I will be asking the WriteTheDocs NA team how we can lure some of those bright minds in.

Sadly it's unlikely I will be able to see their talented array of speakers as I will still be recovering from surgery. But a small party one evening or a brunch at the office might be possible. Knowing them it will likely involve sponsorship or beer. Or both. We shall see.

I think it's a worthwhile goal to have free intermediate-level Python sample code available, and I can't think of a better way for a relative beginner to get into an open source project. I also like the idea that two communities can come together over it and learn from each other. Suffice it to say, if there are enough people with a hundred bucks* in their pocket for a six-hour video training I am happy to use part of my share in the profits to support this project to some degree.

[DISCLOSURE: The author will receive a proportion of any profit from the O'Reilly Intermediate Python video series]

* This figure was plucked from the air before publication, and is still a good guideline, though as PyCon opened (Apr 11) a special deal was available on a package of both Jessica McKellar's Introduction to Python and my Intermediate Python.


@pbanaszkiewicz said...

I was just today looking for something like this: an intermediate Python course, preferably done in IPython.

As your videos' price make them out of reach for me, I'm really looking forward to these notebooks.

How soon and where to look for them?

Steve said...

@pbanaszkiewicz - thanks for spurring me to update the post to include the repository link - look for the edit above. If a 50% reduction would allow you to purchase the videos please get in touch privately, or let me have some way to contact you. As I say in the post, I realize that such pricing is out of the reach of many people, so I am happy you can at least see (and hopefully run) the code.